Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Is it Natural?

Today I'm very proud of myself. Well okay, truth be told I forgot it was 2/15 and that the Valentine's candy is 50-75% off. I went to a little natural food store in Westboro, MA during lunch. I like it there because they sell a few things that I eat daily. Ginger chews by the Ginger People are a part of my food requirements. I work with dirty, germ-infested college students (read: students that work in dental clinics!! Stranger's mouths!!) so I need to bolster my cold-fighting superpowers in any way I can.

So, ginger it is. Works for me. I also like gum without fake sugar (headache inducer for me) so this little food store sells all flavors of Glee gum (yay, local New England company). I also noticed the organic dried fruit and bulk bins are cheaper than...Whole Foods. Not cheaper than Trader Joe's but...it's nice to support a small business.

Every day I see some new sort of food product in the food kitchen. It's a cookie that can be eaten for breakfast (filled with lots of weird chemicals, btw)! It's a bar that can  be...also eaten for breakfast! How long do you get through your morning eating a highly processed cookie? I think I'd get a headache, a stomachache, and make it to...maybe 10am before I was starving again.

Recently at this little natural food store I saw a local policewoman buying her lunch. I was thinking "wow, she's not buying donuts." and "I can tell she never eats donuts." She was buying dried fruits and nuts and cereal. She looked smoking hot. She was probably the only cop on duty at that moment not eating somewhere bad. If food from the health food store helps her get through her shift than so be it.

I know the food store is not the cheapest in town, but I like going in there a couple of times per month. For the ginger chews, the Glee gum, and the pitted dates. Do you have a little local store near you that you buy food at (even if it's not the cheapest place in town)? Do you eat breakfast cookies?

I found a breakfast cookie recipe just in case you want to make your own (healthy) version.

8 comments:

  1. I haven't 'found' my little store yet, I've come across a couple but their prices are pretty outlandish... but I will make it a point this week or next to go check out the little bakery just a block away, something I can walk to and maybe find a little treat made close to home... We all need to support local whenever we can. The big chains... it's everything... Walmart the money goes... on expansion in another city (that often doesn't want it) or whatever. If you shop local that local business can then shop local also driving the local economy. When we shop at the places local that keep the money local... we all benefit! Thanks for the reminder. Between shopping the local specialty shops and bargain shopping via thrift stores instead of buying the "new" junk at Walmart and its ilk that may break within a couple months... much better uses of our resources, the thrift stores often support local charities...

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    1. I know it is far for you but if you *ever* get the chance in your travels to visit Belfast, Maine I think you would love it. :) There's even a little co-op grocery store and little restaurants and bistros. Very different than many parts of Maine. Also, you mention Walmart...I mentioned Trader Joe's. There's a lot of people that feel TJs is small, local, family run but that's all in good marketing. Truth be told here in the States it makes more than Bed Bath and Beyond.

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    2. oh and yes--support a locally owned Thrift store, good reminder (thank you).

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  2. I do plan on traveling again, and I'll have to put it on my list. The last few times I've headed to the Maritimes it's been through Quebec, haven't been through that part of the States in... I guess 20 years this summer. I get tired of "going the same way" all the time in my travels I even have 10+ routes to get home from work just so I can see something different, it actually led me to find a specialty kitchenware shop it's ALL they sell so they have stuff that I've definitely never seen before. Probably go through them when its time to buy my pressure canner just because they specialize and will be able to give me "extra" attention instead of Joe average in the kitchen-ware department that usually works electronics ;P

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    1. I use a pressure cooker as my canner. :)

      Yeah, the Maine coast is so pretty. My place is 1/2 hour from Belfast and I have not been to the coast in a while. I need to go exploring this weekend.

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  3. ...please elaborate about the "pressure cooker as my canner." My wife is an awesome old-school canner and wants to make the move to pressure-cooker-style...

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    1. Sure! So for certain types of canning you have to really can. Like for pickles you can do refrigerator pickles but you can't do that with something more acidic like tomato sauce (botulism). The good news is you can buy a pressure cooker (even one from the 1970s works). So for a pressure cooker you can of course make food (comes with a recipe book typically) but we only use ours to can. If we want to make jam, pickles, or sauces we process using a pressure cooker. This allows the jars to seal, sanitizes them, and processes the jars just like what would happen in a factory. Some foods canned this way can last for years! I can send you some canning blog links if you need more info. I got my pressure cooker at BBBeyond I think.

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  4. Please send them blog links...and thank you much!

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